CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 439

_id caadria2010_012
id caadria2010_012
authors Gu, Ning; Vishal Singh and Kathryn Merrick
year 2010
title A framework to integrate generative design techniques for enhancing design automation
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 127-136
summary This paper presents and demonstrates a computational framework that facilitates the integration of different generative design techniques to enhance design automation. The framework is based on the evaluation and comparison of four main generative design algorithms. Effectiveness of the framework is demonstrated through an example scenario. Compared to most existing generative design systems that are based on one of the techniques, which often bias the generative design process in a certain direction, new generative design systems by applying the proposed framework will provide the trigger at each stage as demonstrated in the example scenario for the designer to perceive the emergent designs from different viewpoints. This advantage will enhance design generation and automation by assisting the designer in making more informed decisions in understanding and selecting the suitable generative techniques for different design needs.
keywords Generative design systems; shape grammars; L-systems; cellular automata; genetic algorithms
series CAADRIA
email ning.gu@newcastle.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2010_015
id caadria2010_015
authors Coorey, Ben
year 2010
title Scalability: parametric strategies from exoskeletons to the city
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 155-163
summary This research will explore and provide an initial study into the diversity of contemporary computational design methodologies emerging in the field of architecture. It will rely on modern philosophical and mathematical ideas as a resource to integrate a seemingly disparate set of design techniques into a unified framework for architectural design. The explorations in this paper will demonstrate a preliminary study into various methods of operating across this framework through a series of parametric design experiments that span across multiple scales. The result indicates new techniques and skills that are becoming increasingly important for architectural design.
keywords Parametric; generative; systems; interface; design
series CAADRIA
email bpcoorey@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia10_258
id acadia10_258
authors Doumpioti, Christina; Greenberg, Evan L.; Karatzas, Konstantinos
year 2010
title Embedded Intelligence: Material Responsiveness in Façade Systems
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 258-262
summary This paper presents recent research for new mechanical systems and façade designs that are able to respond to environmental changes through local interactions, inspired by biological systems. These are based on a model of distributed intelligence founded on insect and animal collectives, from which intelligent behavior emerges through simple local associations. Biological collective systems integrate material form and responsiveness and have the potential to inform new architectural and engineering strategies. The proposed façade system uses integrated sensors and actuators that moderate their local environments through simple interactions with their immediate neighbors. Computational techniques coupled to manufacturing methods and material logics create an integral design framework leading to heterogeneous environmental and structural conditions, producing local responses to environmental stimuli, and ultimately, effective performance of the whole system.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email evanlgreenberg@gmail.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id acadia10_313
id acadia10_313
authors Banda, Pablo
year 2010
title Parametric Propagation of Acoustical Absorbers
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 313-319
summary The following paper deals with a performance-driven morphogenetic design task to improve the conditions of room acoustics, using as a case study the material laboratory of the School of Architecture at Federico Santa Maria University of Technology. Combining contemporary Parametric Modeling techniques and a Performance- Based approach, an automatic generative system was produced. This system generated a modular acoustic ceiling based on Helmholtz Resonators. To satisfy sound absorption requirements, acoustic knowledge was embedded within the system. It iterates through a series of design sub-tasks from Acoustic Simulation to Digital Fabrication, searching for a suitable design solution. The internal algorithmic complexity of the design process has been explored through this case study. Although it is focused on an acoustic component, the proposed design methodology can influence other experiences in Parametric Design.
keywords Parametric Modeling, Sound Absorption & Acoustic Knowledge, Performance-Based Design, Design Task, Scripting, Digital Fabrication, Custom Tools, Honeycomb.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email pablo.banda.p@hotmail.com
last changed 2010/12/07 13:27

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2010_053
id caadria2010_053
authors Doumpioti, C.
year 2010
title Fibre composite systems: stress as growth-promoting agent
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 575-584
summary The main intention of this paper is to propose a theoretical framework for an integrated design methodology which incorporates natural morhogenetic principles for the realisation of fibre composite structures. Stress, in these processes, becomes the driving force of shape modification and fibre articulation, while the material thresholds become a driver of generative evolution. The inferences and results of such an approach will be looked into using a case study of a composite monocoque shell bridge design.
series CAADRIA
email Christina.Doumpioti@aaschool.ac.uk
last changed 2010/03/12 06:10

_id caadria2010_027
id caadria2010_027
authors Fernando, Ruwan; Robin Drogemuller, Flora Dilys Salim and Jane Burry
year 2010
title Patterns, heuristics for architectural design support: making use of evolutionary modelling in design
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 283-292
summary Software used by architectural and industrial designers has shifted from becoming a tool for drafting, towards use in verification, simulation, project management and remote project sharing. In more advanced models, design parameters for the designed object can be adjusted so that a family of variations can be produced rapidly. With the advances in computer aided design (CAD) technology, design options can now be generated and analyzed in real time. However the use of digital tools to support design as an activity is still at an early stage and has largely been limited in functionality with regard to the design process. To date, major CAD vendors have not developed an integrated tool that is able to leverage specialised design knowledge from various discipline domains (known as expert knowledge systems) as well as to support the creation of design alternatives that satisfy different forms of constraints. We propose that evolutionary computing and machine learning be linked with parametric design techniques in order to monitor a designer’s cognition and intent based on their design history. This will lead to results that impact future work on design support systems which are capable of supporting implicit constraint and problem definition for wicked problems that are difficult to quantify.
keywords Design support; heuristics; generative modelling; parametric modelling; evolutionary computation
series CAADRIA
email r1fernando@qut.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia10_103
id acadia10_103
authors Flöry, Simon; Pottmann, Helmut
year 2010
title Ruled Surfaces for Rationalization and Design in Architecture
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 103-109
summary In this work, we address the challenges in the realization of free-form architecture and complex shapes in general with the technical advantages of ruled surfaces. We propose a geometry processing framework to approximate (rationalize) a given shape by one or multiple strips of ruled surfaces. We discuss techniques to achieve an overall smooth surface and develop a parametric model for the generation of curvature continuous surfaces composed of ruled surface strips. We illustrate the usability of the proposed process at hand of several projects, where the pipeline has been applied to compute NC data for mould production and to rationalize large parts of free-form facades.
keywords geometry processing; architectural geometry; ruled surface; strip model; surface fitting
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email floery@evolute.at
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id ecaade2010_107
id ecaade2010_107
authors Gaiani, Marco; Ferioli, Silvia; Ricci, Pier Carlo; Barone, Mirko; Agnoletti, Michele
year 2010
title A Framework for a Sustainable Design and Presentation Process of Furniture Collection
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.471-480
summary Design and presentation of new furniture is today a great challenge that requires a large amount of resources: exhibition space, photographic studios, physical prototypes, etc. In this paper we present a new RTR framework RTR-based that allows a more sustainable design and communication process. The framework is addressed to furniture designers, interior designers, furniture companies and presents techniques and methods developed to meet the requirement to ensure predictive rendering quality required by the high level furniture industries. Finally, in order to ensure full functionality a number of tools described in the paper were developed.
wos WOS:000340629400051
keywords Real-time rendering; Semantic modeling; Virtual furniture design
series eCAADe
email marco.gaiani@unibo.it
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_051
id ecaade2010_051
authors Girot, Christophe; Bernhard, Mathias; Ebno_ther, Yves; Fricker, Pia; Kapellos, Alexandre; Melsom, James
year 2010
title Towards a Meaningful Usage of Digital CNC Tools: Within the field of large-scale landscape architecture
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.371-378
summary The innovative and integrative use of digital CNC technologies in the field of landscape architecture is, for the most part, quite new when compared with the field of architecture. The following paper focuses on new techniques for visualizing work processes and developments for large-scale landscape designs. The integration of these processes within a teaching environment stands at the forefront. In this context, the use of programmed tools and the immediate translation of preliminary design ideas to models using the Mini Mill in the studio allow students to investigate and test new approaches. Next steps will be explored through the use of parametric design tools.
wos WOS:000340629400039
keywords Digital aids to design creativity; Generative design; Modes of production; Shape studies
series eCAADe
email bernhard@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ascaad2010_109
id ascaad2010_109
authors Hamadah, Qutaibah
year 2010
title A Computational Medium for the Conceptual Design of Mix-Use Projects
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 109-116
summary Mix use development is receiving wide attention for its unique sustainable benefits. Nevertheless, the planning and designing of successful mixed use projects in today's environment is a complex matrix of skill sets and necessary collaborations between various stakeholders and design professionals. From a design point of view, architects are required to manage and coordinate large information sets, which are many time at odds with one another. The expansive space of knowledge and information is at its best vague and substantially ill-structured. A situation that continues to overburden architects mental and intellectual ability to understand, address and communicate the design issue. In the face of this complex condition, designers are gravitating towards information modeling to manage and organize the expansive data. However, is becoming increasingly evident that current building information modeling applications are less suited for early design activity due to their interrupted and rigid workflows. Against this background, this paper presents a theoretical framework for a computational medium to support the designer during early phases of exploring and investigating design alternatives for mix-use projects. The focus is on the conjecture between programming and conceptual design phase; when uncertainty and ambiguity as at its maximum, and the absence of computational support continues to be the norm. It must be noted however, the aim of the medium is not to formulate or automate design answers. Rather, to support designers by augmenting and enhancing their ability to interpret, understand, and communicate the diverse and multi-faceted design issue. In literature on interpretation, Hans-Georg Gadamer explains that understanding is contingent on an act of construction. To understand something is to construct it. In light of this explanation. To help designers understand the design issue, is to help them construct it. To this end, the computational medium discussed in this paper is conceived to model (construct) the mix-use architectural program. In effect, turning it into a dynamic and interactive information model in the form of a graph (network). This is an important development because it will enable an entirely new level of interaction between the designer and the design-problem. It will allow the designer to gather, view, query and repurpose the information in novel ways. It will offer the designer a new context to foster knowledge and understanding about the ill-structured and vague design issue. Additionally, the medium would serve well to communicate and share knowledge between the various stakeholders and design professionals. Central to the discussion are two questions: First, how can architects model the design program using a graph? Second, what is the nature of the proposed computational medium; namely, its components and defining properties?
series ASCAAD
email qutaibah@mac.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2010_097
id ascaad2010_097
authors Kenzari, Bechir
year 2010
title Generative Design and the Reduction of Presence
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 97-106
summary Digital design/fabrication is slowly emancipating architectural design from its traditional static/representational role and endowing it instead with a new, generative function. In opposition to the classical isomorphism between drawings and buildings, wherein the second stand as translations of the first, the digital design/fabrication scenario does not strictly fall within a semiotic frame as much as within a quasi biological context, reminiscent of the Aristotelian notion of entelechy. For the digital data does not represent the building as much it actively works to become the building itself. Only upon sending a given file to a machine does the building begin to materialize as an empirical reality, And eventually a habitable space as we empirically know it. And until the digital data actualizes itself, the building qua building is no more than one single, potential possibility among many others. This new universe of digital design/fabrication does not only cause buildings to be produced as quick, precise, multiply-generated objects but also reduces their presence as original entities. Like cars and fashion items, built structures will soon be manufactured as routinely-consumed items that would look original only through the subtle mechanisms of flexibility: frequent alteration of prototype design (Style 2010, Style 2015..) and “perpetual profiling” (mine, yours, hers,..). The generic will necessarily take over the circumstantial. But this truth will be veiled since “customized prototypes” will be produced or altered to individual or personal specifications. This implies that certain “myths” have to be generated to speed up consumption, to stimulate excessive use and to lock people into a continuous system which can generate consumption through a vocabulary of interchangeable, layered and repeatable functions. Samples of “next season’s buildings” will be displayed and disseminated to enforce this strategy of stimulating and channeling desire. A degree of manipulation is involved, and the consumer is flattered into believing that his or her own free assessment of and choice between the options on offer will lead him or her to select the product the advertiser is seeking to sell. From the standpoint of the architect as a maker, the rising upsurge of digital design and fabrication could leave us mourning the loss of what has been a personal stomping ground, namely the intensity of the directly lived experiences of design and building. The direct, sensuous contact with drawings, models and materials is now being lost to a (digital) realm whose attributes refer to physical reality only remotely. Unlike (analogue) drawings and buildings, digital manipulations and prototypes do not exercise themselves in a real space, and are not subjected in the most rigorous way to spatial information. They denote in this sense a loss of immediacy and a withering of corporal thought. This flexible production of space and the consequent loss of immediate experience from the part of the designer will be analyzed within a theoretical framework underpinned mainly by the works of Walter Benjamin. Samples of digitally-produced objects will be used to illustrate this argument.
series ASCAAD
email b.kenzari@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ecaade2010_117
id ecaade2010_117
authors Koenig, Reinhard; Thurow, Torsten; Braunes, Jo_rg; Tonn, Christian; Donath, Dirk; Schneider, Sven
year 2010
title FREAC: A Technical Introduction to a Framework for Enhancing Research in Architectural Design and Communication
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.445-451
summary This paper describes a framework for a collaborative, dynamically modifiable product model called FREAC built for the purposes of experimental software development. When developing FREAC, we attempted to realise the following properties that are typically lacking in currently available commercial systems: first, a high degree of flexibility so that it is highly adaptable to the needs of different disciplines; second, the ability to seamlessly connect different tools; third, real-time concurrent modelling by different remote partners; fourth, the ability to save a record of the entire modelling process; fifth, dynamic extensibility both for software developers as well as for the end users of the respective tools.
wos WOS:000340629400048
keywords Software development; Experimental platform; Product model; Digital building model
series eCAADe
email reinhard.koenig@uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2010_058
id ecaade2010_058
authors Oezener, Ozan Oender; Jeong, Woonseong; Haliburton, James; Clayton, Mark J.
year 2010
title Utilizing 4D BIM Models in the Early Stages of Design
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.89-96
summary Architectural design education can benefit from incorporation of 4D CAD techniques into a BIM-enabled process for rapid design and assessment of alternatives. Experimental courses conducted at two universities provide evidence that graduate students possessing modest skills with BIM software can adopt 4D CAD methods and integrate them into their design process with minimal effort. The method enables student teams to gain insight into the construction issues of their designs and iteratively improve design alternatives.
wos WOS:000340629400009
keywords BIM; 4D visualization; Design; Collaboration; Integrated project delivery
series eCAADe
email ozener@itu.edu.tr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ijac20108303
id ijac20108303
authors Rafael, Urquiza S.
year 2010
title Parametric Performative Systems: Designing a Bioclimatic Responsive Skin
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 3, pp. 279-300
summary This paper assumes the façade as an innovative element of interaction between the inside and the outside: the architectural skin. As in nature, one of its most significant functions is the energy exchange with the environment. Similarly, efficiency increases by passive and active responses to climate conditions and site orientation. This research explores the potential of parametric techniques, programming and digital manufacturing, to design and build a Bioclimatic Responsive Skin (BRS). Firstly, we designed a bio-component applicable to any surface due to its parametric nature. Secondly, we fabricated two non-reactive working prototypes to study the manufacturing and construction details. Thirdly, we integrated the physical and the digital interfaces by using Generative Components™, Arduino, and Ubimash to generate a kinetic responsive model. This prototype was presented at SmartGeometry Workshop and Conference 2010. Finally, Lem3a architecture used this BRS in a real design project for a Sustainable house in New Hope, PA.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ascaad2010_171
id ascaad2010_171
authors Schimek, H.; A. Meisel and T. Bogenperger
year 2010
title On Connecting Panels of Freeform Building Envelopes
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 171-178
summary As smooth geometric shapes are very tricky to manufacture with an overall great expense this paper presents a parametrical approach how to control the joint geometry within a framework of flat panels which approximate a freeform surface using discretization. Since timber has an excellent reputation as a sustainable and regenerative material plus the fact that timber can be perfectly processed with a large variety of tools including CNC milling machines we are using cross laminated timber boards (CLT) with large and heavy members. Hence that means dealing with high forces which require geometrically exact and often complex joints, which we want to push to a high degree of automation in the design process. We establish rules and constraints between all neighboring CLT-panels. That way we control a new connector system specially designed for non-standard CLT-joints. This paper documents the status of one aspect of an ongoing research project and will also give a preview to upcoming tasks including the production of a prototype structure.
series ASCAAD
type normal paper
email schimek@tugraz.at
last changed 2011/03/01 06:46

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2010_054
id caadria2010_054
authors Wong, Chit Kin D. and Yim Fun L. Cheung
year 2010
title Simply complex: a case study of construction-driven design using computational methods
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 585-594
summary This paper explores how fabrication-based criteria can be integrated into design processes through computational methods. Based on the ongoing project of the Library of the Bao’an Cultural Complex in Shenzhen, China (referred as ‘the Library’ in this paper hereafter), this paper discusses the process of the rationalisation of an intuitive architectural form and its subsequent tiling design based on the adaptation to the conventional fabrication techniques of the building façade industry in China. These objectives are followed by the establishment of robust computational systems of automation that provide a concrete basis for the visualisation, the development of envelope details, and the generation of the list of component data for fabrication. This integrative approach is markedly different from a more conventional one, in which computational systems serve as a priori solutions to unconstraint design sketches.
keywords Fabrication criteria; rationalisation; computation workfl ow
series CAADRIA
email wongchitkin@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

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