CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 452

_id 744e
id 744e
authors Kilian, Axel; Ochsendorf, John
year 2005
title PARTICLE-SPRING SYSTEMS FOR STRUCTURAL FORM FINDING
source Journal for the international Association for shell and spatial structures:IASS
summary Particle Spring Systems are well-known in computer science for creating physical simulations. In this paper we propose the use of particle-spring systems for finding structural forms composing only axial forces.
keywords particle-spring systems, form finding, structure, architecture
series journal paper
type normal paper
email akilian@mit.edu
more http://destech.mit.edu/akilian/projectpages/cadenary.html
last changed 2005/10/24 02:41

_id b086
id b086
authors Hofmeyer, Herm
year 1995
title UNTERSUCHUNG DER PARAMETEREMPFINDLICHKEIT BEI PROBLEMEN DER STRUKTUROPTIMIERUNG
source Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Baustatik, Prof. Dr.-Ing. E. Ramm, Stuttgart, Germany
summary Besides the development of benchmarks for structural optimization, this report shows that optimization techniques can be used not only for changing structural elements, but also for changing structural topology and thus potentially whole building designs. This is relevant for computer aided structural design in general and for interaction of spatial and structural design as presented by the author at eCAADe 2005.
keywords structural optimization; form-finding; structural topology
series report
type normal paper
email h.hofmeyer@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2006/04/21 05:58

_id cf2005_2_61_192
id cf2005_2_61_192
authors HOLZER Dominik, TANG Jiwu, XIE Mik2 and BURRY Mark
year 2005
title Design Using Evolutionary Optimisation and Associative Geometry
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 243-254
summary This paper describes the usage of parametric design and evolutionary optimisation techniques in architect-engineer collaborations. It discusses the apparent challenges in setting up a trans-disciplinary working-platform that cuts across profession-specific boundaries and negotiates between the otherwise distinct work-methodologies through the use of intelligent CAAD applications. Two approaches to architectural form finding have been combined in this research. The first, parametric design, uses a proprietary package as a key element to the organisation and reorganisation of architectural design. By doing so, it is providing it with intrinsic flexibility allowing designers to go beyond form and accommodate performance data for versioning. The second, ESO (Evolutionary Structural Optimisation), is an engineering tool based on the use of finite element analysis (FEA) capable of optimising the formal geometry of an object to obtain minimum volume under even stress-distribution through an iterative design process. In undertaking this research it became apparent that different levels of resolution need to be addressed in the form-finding process in order to investigate the full potential of the interactive use of parametric design and evolutionary optimisation. The case studies reflect this diversity and demonstrate more successes, limitations and future challenges within the transdisciplinary, collaborative effort.
keywords associative geometry, evolutionary structural optimisation, architect engineer collaboration, finite element analysis
series CAAD Futures
email Dominik.holzer@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id 9c37
id 9c37
authors Coates P, Derix C, Krakhofer S and Karanouh A
year 2005
title Generating Architectural Spatial Configurations: two approaches using voronoi tessellations and particle systems
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary It was one of the primary goals of the original Master’s programme in Computing and design at UEL in 1991 that we should work towards defining morphological generative processes for the conceptual design of architectural objects. These two papers offer a range of techniques which have been developed by two of this years MSc students (04-05) which show that we are getting close to this. The approaches range from computational geometric approaches (3d parametrics and voronoi diagrams) to emergent spatial organisation using agent based modelling. In many cases the resultant geometry is defined to the point where it can be transferred to advanced evaluation and fabrication systems, thus making this work sufficiently developed to begin to form a useful part in practical design processes.
keywords morphology, computational geometry, particle systems, physical simulation, voronoi diagrams
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:39

_id acadia06_538
id acadia06_538
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2006
title Light Exchange
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 538-539
summary The notions of collaborative exchanges, leadership, and entrepreneurialism that cross disciplinary boundaries were promoted in a digital design-build studio taught in spring 2005. With the starting funds of one dollar, the studio took up the challenge of building two full-scale tensile fabric structures that mark the entrances to a downtown San Antonio building. Structures of 1200 square feet total surface area were successfully designed, engineered, and executed within a semester framework at a final cost of $102,490. Collaborations were fostered with 24 industry partners from Asia, Europe, Australia, and USA, including four structural engineers. Innovative pedagogical, collaborative and project management methods were employed. The studio was structured as a self-organized design “firm.” Positions were created and students were “hired” into the firm to play different roles. The studio utilized web-based communication and project management tools. After a four-week warm-up project that established an innovative studio culture, professional schedules were prepared and the engineers were engaged in the collaborative process of designing the anchors, cables, connections and PTFE/PVC membranes. The peculiarities of digitally designing, fabricating and erecting tensile fabric structures were comprehensively explored. The studio completed all the CNC fabrication, concrete footings and membrane fabrication at local workshops through special partnerships.
series ACADIA
email mahesh@mahesh.org
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia05_226
id acadia05_226
authors Biloria, N., Oosterhuis, K. and Aalbers, C.
year 2005
title Design Informatics
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 226-235
summary The research paper exemplifies a novel information integrated design technique developed at ONL (Oosterhuis and Lenard), Netherlands, specifically appropriated for envisaging complex geometric forms. The ‘informed design technique’, apart from being highly instrumental in conceptualizing and generating the geometric component constituting architectural form in a parametric manner, is also efficiently utilized for precise computer aided manufacturing and construction of the speculated form. Geometric complexities inherent in contemporary architectural constructs and the time spent in appropriation of such topologies, fueled the ‘informed design’ approach, which caters to issues of timely construction, precision oriented design and production (visual and material) and parametric modeling attuned to budgetary fluctuations. This design-research approach has been tested and deployed by ONL, for conceiving ‘the Acoustic Barrier’ project, Utrecht Leidsche Rijn in the Netherlands and is treated as a generic case for exemplifying the ‘informed design’ technique in this research paper. The design methodology encourages visualizing architectural substantiations from a systems perspective and envisages upon a rule based adaptive systems approach involving extrapolation of contextual dynamics/ground data in terms of logical ‘rules’. These rules/conditionalities form the basis for spawning parametric logistics to be mapped upon geometric counterparts exemplifying the conception. The simulated parametric relations bind dimensional aspects (length, width, height etc.) of the geometric construct in a relational manner, eventually culminating in a 3D spatial envelope. This evolved envelope is subsequently intersected with a ‘parametric spatio-constructive grid’, creating specific intersecting points between the two. The hence extorted ‘point cloud’ configuration serves as a generic information field concerning highly specific coordinates, parameters and values for each individual point/constructive node it embodies. The relations between these points are directly linked with precise displacements of structural profiles and related scaling factors of cladding materials. Parallel to this object oriented modeling approach, a detailed database (soft/information component) is also maintained to administer the relations between the obtained points. To be able to derive constructible structural and cladding components from the point cloud configuration customized Scripts (combination of Lisp and Max scripts) process the point cloud database. The programmed script-routines, iteratively run calculations to generate steel-wireframes, steel lattice-structure and cladding panels along with their dimensions and execution drawing data. Optimization-routines are also programmed to make rectifications and small adjustments in the calculated data. This precise information is further communicated with CNC milling machines to manifest complex sectional profiles formulating the construct hence enabling timely and effective construction of the conceptualized form.
series ACADIA
email n.biloria@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_269
id 2005_269
authors Caldas, Luisa and Duarte, José
year 2005
title Fabricating Ceramic Covers
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 269-276
summary This paper describes a studio experiment developed with the aim of exploring the design and fabrication of innovative roof systems based on ceramic tiles using digital technologies. History is rich in examples of the use of ceramic roof tiles since the ancient world. Today’s systems derive from such ancient systems and fall into several basic categories depending on the form of the tiles and how they interlock. These systems present acceptable functional performances due to centuries of refinement, but as they have suffered little formal evolution in recent centuries, to respond to modern needs they require complex layering and assemblies. Recent technological evolution has emphasized the optimization of the tile production process in terms of time saving and cost reduction, and the improvement of product quality in terms of material homogeneity and durability. Little attention has been paid to the tile form and the roof system as a whole, including the assembly process. As a result, despite the variety and performance of existing designs, they are often perceived as outdated by architects who refuse to use them following a stylistic trend in architectural design towards primary forms and flat roofs. The challenge of the experiment was to take advantage of digital design and fabrication technology to conceive systems with improved performance and contemporary designs. The hope was that this could lead architects to consider integrating roof tiles systems in their architectural proposals. Results yielded five different roof systems. These systems are innovative from a formal viewpoint both at the tile and roof level. In addition, they are easy to assemble and possess better thermal and water-proofing performance. Digital technologies were determinant to enable students to design the complex shape of the tiles, to manipulate them into assemblies, and to assess the shape of the roofs, as well as their thermal and structural performance in some cases.
keywords Design Education; Rapid Prototyping; Collaboration; Ceramics; Innovation; Tiles
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_599
id 2005_599
authors Couceiro, Mauro
year 2005
title Architecture and Biological Analogies
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 599-606
summary The study described in this paper evolves within the larger context of a research aimed at inquiring into analogies between architecture and nature, and more specifically between architecture and biology. Biology is a recursive source of architectural inspiration due to the tight relationship between form and function, the natural balance of forces and the corresponding geometric solutions found in living beings. Roughly, one can classify historical analogies between architecture and biology into two main categories. The first tries to mimic biological forms and the second biological processes. The specific goal of the described study is to find how new technologies can redefine and support the process of constructing such analogies. It uses as a case study a tower project designed by the architect Manuel Gausa (ACTAR, Barcelona) called Tornado Tower because of its complex shape inspired in the frozen form of a tornado. Due to the geometric irregularities of the tower, Gausa’s team had difficulties in designing it, especially because solving the structural problems required constant redrawing. This paper describes the first part of the study which primary goal was to conceive a parametric program that encoded the overall shape of the Tornado Tower. The idea was to use the program to simplify the drawing process. This required a mathematical study of spirals and helices which are at the conceptual basis of the external structure and shape of the tower. However, the program encodes not only the shape of Gausa’s tower, but also the shapes of other buildings with conceptual similarities. Such class of shapes is very recurrent in nature with different scales and with different utilities. Therefore, one can argue that the program makes a mathematical connection between a given natural class of shapes and architecture. The second part of the study will be devoted to extending the program with a genetic algorithm with the goal of guiding the generation of solutions taking into account their structural fitness. This way, the analogy with genetic procedures will be emphasized by the study of the evolution of forms and its limits of feasibility. In summary, the bionic shape analogy is made by the generation of mimetic natural forms and a genetic process analogy starts with the parametric treatment of shape based on code manipulations. At the end the program will establish an analogy between architecture and biology both terms of form and process.
keywords Genetics; Evolutionary Systems; Parametric Design
series eCAADe
email mauro@bluebottle.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_547
id 2005_547
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2005
title Crisis? What Crisis?
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 547-556
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with structural (civil) engineers. This is not surprising in consideration of the fact, that the architectural education industry produces far too many new architects for the economy to absorb. In Germany, the number is almost three times too many. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past twenty years so that the skills that architects want to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have idly watched their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields like civil and structural engineering The reasons for this crisis are manifold. In the schools of architecture, the discussions often deal with form or formal arguments, which, in fact, have little or no relevance to the building industry. This position was tenable so long as the clients were willing to accept formal arguments in order to receive buildings of high quality or current social relevance (i.e. current architectural fashion). With the dual aspects of globalisation and a shift to maintaining building stocks rather than producing new buildings, the tolerance for “architectural” discussions has been reduced even further. Indeed, the monetary pressures overwhelm almost all other aspects, including so-called green issues. What is more, most of the monetary issues are time based. Time represents, perhaps, the largest pressure in any current planning project. The clients expect expedient, accurate and inexpensive solutions. If architects are not able to produce these, the clients will (and do) go elsewhere. The authors argue that there remain serious problems to be solved for architects and the metier in general. Ever cheaper, ever faster and ever encompassing information technologies offer the architectural community a chance to turn recent trends on their head. By using information technologies to their full potential, architects can reassert themselves as the coordinators of building information and processes. Simply put, this means less photorealistic rendering and more databases, which may be unappealing for those architects who have positioned themselves as “designers” and are able to talk long on form, but short on cost or logistics. Nonetheless, the situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. It is not a question of one or the other. Architects must be able to offer innovative design solutions that not only address the fiscal, legal and programmatic constraints, but also push the boundaries at to the position of architecture in the community at large. For educators, it must be made clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building process including their expertise concerning questions of architectural form, function, history and art. Precisely while they are generalists are architects invaluable in a sea of specialists. The biggest hurdle to asserting this in the past has been the control of the vast amounts of information. This is no longer a problem and also no longer an excuse. In the education of architects, it must be made clear that their role dictates sovereignty over architectural information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which including Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Mangement, Computer Supported Design Studios, CSCW
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_93_166
id cf2005_1_93_166
authors KOCATURK, Tuba and VELTKAMP, Martijn
year 2005
title Interdisciplinary Knowledge Modelling for Free-Form Design – An Educational Experiment
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 465-474
summary The recent advances in digital design media and digital fabrication processes have introduced formal and procedural effects on the conception and production of architecture. In order to bridge the individual concepts and processes of multiple design disciplines, intensive cross-disciplinary communication and information exchange starting from the very early stages of design is necessary. A web-based database for design learning and design teaching named BLIP is introduced. In this framework, cross-disciplinary domain knowledge becomes explicit to be taught and transferred in Free-Form Design research and education. BLIP proposes a conceptual map through which the user can construct structured representations of concepts and their relationships. These concepts are high-level abstractions of formal, structural and production related concepts in Free-Form design development. BLIP is used for formalizing, organizing and representing conceptual maps of the three domains and facilitates information and knowledge sharing in collaborative conceptual design in context. The paper introduces the application together with its application in two educational design experiments.
keywords collaborative design, constraint based design, design process, digital design education, free-form design
series CAAD Futures
email T.Kocaturk@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_147
id 2005_147
authors Lai, Ih-Cheng
year 2005
title Infilling Time into Space - A Pedagogical Approach for Evolving Space Using Digital Media
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 147-154
summary This paper presents a pedagogical approach to explore the relationships between time and space by using digital media. Based on a pedagogical model called e-Space proposed by Lai (2004), we apply motion as a spatial issue to approach this study. Through integrating with the characteristics of digital media, students are encouraged to evolve architectural space and form by decomposing, re-organizing, interpreting and realizing the spatial composition. Simultaneously, diverse digital media applications integrated with design thinking in a design process enables students to bridge two design spaces - physical and virtual. This process introduces the students to a new approach of design-creation and form finding. Finally, we use an advanced digital media course as an example to understand the impacts of the pedagogical approach. The students’ outcomes are also reported in this paper
keywords Digital Media, Pedagogy, Motion, Design Space, Design Learning
series eCAADe
email ihcheng@ms32.hinet.net
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_212
id acadia05_212
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2005
title Modern Translations, Contemporary Methods: DL-1_Resonance House®
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 212-225
summary As the first design-build-fabricate-assemble experiment at our school, the intent of the studio was to design a framework from which to examine a “lived space” through digital-to-digital processes. Moving from digital models and physical stereo lithographic models to hand-fabrication and digital assembly allowed the students to move from creation to completion. As part of our holistic design process, the studio fabricated almost all components for the project. These elements include the wood flooring, the copper and wood skins, the building’s structural panels, and the two-story light vortex. This single-family, in-fill house is located within an historic downtown neighborhood and is subject to historic district zoning regulations, design guidelines, and Board of Architecture Review approvals. The project is analogous to design challenges presenting themselves in historic districts throughout the United States including the Savannah, Georgia site for the 2005 ACADIA Conference. The scale of the project relates well to the horizontal nature of this context and after a formal, televised review process with the local Board of Architecture Review, the project represents a dynamic, yet sympathetic architectural dialogue with the surrounding buildings. The project develops simultaneously from the exterior and interior resulting in two courtyards that mediate the urban “front door” and the private “terrace.” The students designed these areas through a series of two-dimensional axonometric drawings, three-dimensional physical and digital models, and four-dimensional time-based animations. The building massing separates into two core elements: gabled copper volume and wood screen volume. These elements maintain their conceptual purity by using the same types of modulations on their skins. The copper form with its deep-cut reveals and proportionally placed light scoring patterns reflects the horizontal datum lines of the floor, sill, threshold, and ceiling. In contrast, the wood volume reflects these same lines as applied “shadow screens” which create depths that seamlessly tie together the side, rear, and front facades.The hinge point of the house is the light vortex. Designed in Rhino, translated in Catia, fabricated out of aluminum, and clad in stainless steel, this two-story sculptural element will literally wrap light around its surfaces. Like a sunflower, the light vortex, with its angel hair stainless steel finish, responds to the incremental differentiation of light throughout the day. Photosensitive floor-mounted lights designed to augment the volume of natural light will provide a continuous light rendition on the sculpture. The project, scheduled for completion at the end of the 2005 summer session, is at the time of this submission about 60% complete.
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_751
id 2005_751
authors Szalapaj, Peter
year 2005
title The Digital Design Process in Contemporary Architectural Practice
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 751-759
summary There is an increasing trend in contemporary architectural projects towards dependence upon digital processes for their organisation and technical evaluation of a range of design criteria. Digital representations are central not only to form generation and structural analysis, but also to the integration of fabrication and construction directly with the earlier design stages. It is important to bear in mind, however, that digital technology is only a means to an end which is the design process itself. Each technique of digital representation and analysis brings advantages and disadvantages to this process, and should therefore be described in these terms. It is becoming increasingly feasible to develop a rapid succession of distinct digital models, both geometric and dynamic, in early design stages. These can be tested and evaluated with respect to a range of analytical criteria, and the results of these analyses can affect further model development thus forming a cyclical process of 3-D digital model generation.
keywords Dynamic Modelling, Geometric Modelling, Surface Modelling, Parametric Representation, Digital Fabrication
series eCAADe
email p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2005_b_4a_a
id caadria2005_b_4a_a
authors Ravi S. Srinivasan, Ali M. Malkawi
year 2005
title Reinforcement Learning and Real-time Building Thermal Performance Data Visualization
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 141-148
summary Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to predict the fluid behavior and particle systems-in-action in three-dimensional space, allowing experts to evaluate a series of environmental decisions in designing buildings. Although computing power has increased in the past decade, detailed CFD simulations introduce time-delay that defeats the notion of real-time data visualization. A method that can bypass the time-consuming simulations and generate results comparable to detailed CFD simulations will allow such visualizations to be constructed. This paper discusses a pilot project that utilizes a Reinforcement Learning (RL) algorithm coupled with a simplified fluid dynamics equation to generate thermal performance data for real-time visualization.
series CAADRIA
email sravi@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_047
id 2005_047
authors Kieferle, Joachim, Grunau, Jens and Cheng, Nancy
year 2005
title Intercontinental Seating
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 47-54
summary In spring 2005, four universities and one manufacturer on three continents designed seating units in the virtual design studio “Intercontinental Seating”. With each location describing local characters and sites for the remote designers, we were able to keep focus on comparative cultural contexts in design. A central content management system (Typo3) proved to be an effective platform for project representation and communication, both for students and external critics. Further communication and presentation technologies have been tested. As a result of this workshop, the manufacturer will develop two designs with the students and intends to offer these seating units in his product portfolio.
keywords Virtual Design Studio; Design Methodology; Planning Approach; Learning Environment
series eCAADe
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_64_168
id cf2005_1_64_168
authors ACHTEN Henri
year 2005
title Resolving some Ambiguities in Real-time Design Drawing Recognition by means of a Decision Tree for Agents
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 311-320
summary In this paper, we present a theoretical study on automated understanding of the design drawing. This can lead to design support through the natural interface of sketching. In earlier work, 24 plan-based conventions of depiction have been identified, such as grid, zone, axial system, contour, and element vocabulary. These are termed graphic units. Graphic units form a good basis for recognition of drawings as they combine shape with meaning. We present some of the theoretical questions that have to be resolved before an implementation can be made. The contribution of this paper is: (i) identification of domain knowledge which is necessary for recognition; (ii) outlining combined strategy of multi-agent systems and online recognition; (iii) functional structure for agents and their organisation to converge on sketch recognition.
keywords multi-agent system, decision tree, pattern recognition, sketch
series CAAD Futures
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2005_811
id sigradi2005_811
authors Amundarain, Iñaki Martín; Víctor Aperribay ; Jesús Mª Alonso ; José Javier San Martín José Ignacio San Martín ; José Mª Arrieta ; Igor Treviño
year 2005
title Advanced techniques of design in support to medical science: Application to implantological treatments.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 811-817
summary At the present time the importance of the image of people plays a key role. Therefore many people who leave these standards wish to change their aesthetic face one, in occasions to look for characteristics that respond to the modern beauty, and in others, to try to solve a medical problem. In the work that is exposed here, the use of the present technological tools of design appears, like support to the scientific development that it makes possible an effectively learn more express and to the students of Odontolgy, improvement of the quality of the treatments of the doctors and help the patients to see beforehand the final results of the operations, avoiding to see disagreeable images. So, the support of the surgical procedures on systems CAD/CAM is making possible the enormous development of medical science, such form that are every time better, more comfortable to learn and are less traumatic for them. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email eppmaami@sc.ehu.es
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2005_811
id 2005_811
authors Anay, Hakan
year 2005
title A Critical Approach to the Use of Computers in Architectural Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 811-817
summary There are two dominant approaches to architectural and urbanistic problem solving: program based approaches and paradigm based approaches. Beyond these two, this paper proposes the critical/formalist approach as a paradigm for architectural design while summarizing the epistemological foundations of it, and investigates the possible contribution of the computers to this approach. The primary aim is to set a starting point for a more comprehensive future research.
keywords Design Theory, Design Methodology, Computer Aided Design, Formalism, Architectural Form
series eCAADe
email e056756@mail.metu.edu.tr
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_000
id sigradi2005_000
authors Angulo, Antonieta and Vásquez de Velasco, Guillermo (eds.)
year 2005
title SiGradi2005: Vision and Visualization
source Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 978-1-59975-306-5] Lima (Perú) 21-23 november 2005, 826 p.
summary Paradoxically, one of the most difficult but enjoyable things we do is to imagine. To open the eyes of our mind and see what no one else can see. We see images of things that are yet to be and through the same skill we devise ways in which to make them happen. We design the future in the form of environments, graphics, products, films, and a growing range of new media. Our ability to develop a vision and to visualize it is a gift that we are called to cultivate and put to good use. We have been privileged with a great responsibility. In the process of developing a vision and communicating that vision to others, we “visualize”. Visualization can be a very private experience in which we are alone with mental images that help us shape our vision. In other instances visualization can be a component of mass communication. Visualization can be a means or can be an end. It can be a small architectural sketch on a paper napkin or a mega-graphic covering a high-rise building, an airplane or a ship. In every case, the relationship between vision and visualization is a mutually supportive articulation of what our eyes and our minds can see. Our vision of the role of computers in the art and science of visualization is in constant development. Computer visualization can support an intimate dialog between a designer and his/her vision. It can translate and communicate that vision to a larger audience and in the hands of a new-media artist it can actually constitute his/her vision. The 9th Annual Conference of SIGraDI (Ibero American Society for Computer Graphics) will explore our collective vision on the future of digital visualization and digital media in Environmental Design, Product Design, Graphic Design, Cinematography, New Media, and Art. Authors are invited to share their research work with a focus on how it contributes to shape a collective understanding of the past, awareness of the present, and vision of the future in our multiple disciplines.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

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