CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 452

_id cf2005_1_55_94
id cf2005_1_55_94
authors SCHEURER Fabian
year 2005
title Turning the Design Process Downside-up
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 269-278
summary This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing research project that aims at using the power of self-organization for the design and optimisation of irregular spatial structures in real-world applications. An example is presented, which uses a growing swarm to define the configuration of randomly positioned columns in a large concrete structure. This agent based simulation, developed in cooperation with the building's architects and engineers, was successfully used in the final design stage of a project in the Netherlands to resolve the conflicting structural and functional requirements arising from the initial design.
keywords self-organization, emergent design, spatial structure, dynamic simulation
series CAAD Futures
email scheurer@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id cf2005_2_11_132
id cf2005_2_11_132
authors SCHNABEL Marc Aurel
year 2005
title Interplay of Domains
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 11-20
summary A diversified, open-ended, and critical approach of architectural design that interplays with a variety of media, suggests an innovative development to gain new spatial solutions. Architects and designers are aware of these possibilities by integrating physical and digital media during their design process, yet the creative potentials of these media are rarely used to their full potentials. The architectural design process can be enriched by using uncommon perceptions, comprehensions, and conceptions of spatial design translations within both physical and virtual environments. A wilful interplay with the design media and the process offers the possibility to dismantle the limits of each domain and explore the design itself in unorthodox ways. The overall engagement within both real and virtual environments leads to innovative form creations and powerful design solutions. Following the tradition of artists, who explore media in unusual ways, new architectural interpretations emerge, reflecting on the media as well as the architectural design.
keywords design process, design media, form generation, physical and virtual environments
series CAAD Futures
email marcaurel@hku.hk
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id 2005_615
id 2005_615
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 615-621
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use? In addition to providing answers to the above questions this paper presents: 1. Concepts behind L-systems 2. The need to transform L-Systems so they can have creative architectural application possibilities 3. Examples on the architectural use of L-Systems 4. Conclusions
keywords Form Generation, Lindenmayer, String rewriting, Visualization
series eCAADe
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_161
id sigradi2005_161
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 161-166
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use?
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id 5b89
id 5b89
authors Sevaldson, Birger
year 2005
title Developing Digital Design Techniques Investigations on Creative Design Computing
source Oslo School of Architecture and Design, PHD-Thesis
summary 1.1. The themes in this theses 16 1.1.1. Mind the mind gap 16 1.1.2. Prologue: The World Center for Human Concerns 17 1.1.3. Creative computer use 26 1.1.4. Design strategies and techniques 31 1.2. Overview 33 1.2.1. Main issues 34 1.2.2. The material 36 1.2.3. The framework of this thesis 37 2. CURRENT STATE AND BACKGROUND 39 2.1. New tools, old thoughts. 39 2.1.1. A misuse strategy 44 2.1.2. Emergence in design 47 2.1.3. Programming and design 50 2.1.4. Artificial intelligence 53 2.1.5. Human intelligence and artificial representations 53 2.2. Electronic dreams 54 2.2.1. The dream of intuitive software 55 2.2.2. The dream of the designing machine 60 2.2.3. The dream of self-emerging architecture; genetic algorithms in design 61 2.2.4. A cultural lag 62 2.3. Ideas and ideology 64 2.3.1. A personal perspective on the theories of the 1990s 65 2.3.2. "The suffering of diagrams" 68 2.3.3. Architectural theory and design methodology 69 2.4. Ideas on creativity 72 2.4.1. What is creativity? 73 2.4.2. Creativity, a cultural phenomenon. 75 2.4.3. Creativity in the information age 79 2.4.4. Creativity-enhancing techniques 81 2.4.5. Crucial fiicro-cultures 82 2.4.6. A proposal for a practitioner approach to creativity 83 2.5. Summary and conclusion of part 2 84 3. NEW DESIGN TECHNIQUES 86 3.1. Introduction 86 3.2. New technology - new strategy 87 3.3. Thinking through design practice: the inspirational playful design approach 88 3.4. A Corner stone: emergence 89 3.4.1. The source material 94 3.5. Recoding, translation and interpretation 95 A case: Tidsrom 97 3.6. Reconfiguring schemata 109 3.7. Rules and games 113 3.8. Virtuality and virtual models 118 3.8.1. What is "The Virtual"? 118 3.8.2. Virtual reality 119 Investigating "the virtual" 120 3.8.3. Analysing the virtual 126 3.9. Visual thinking (diagrams and visual thinking) 130 3.9.1. Visual Thinking and Abstraction. 130 3.9.2. A heuristic process 132 3.9.3. Visual thinking, skills and tacit knowledge 132 3.9.4. Media for visual thinking 133 3.10. Diagrammatic thinking 138 3.10.1. Descriptive diagrams 142 3.10.2. Generative diagrams 144 3.10.3. Versioning 149 3.10.4. Finding 153 3.10.5. Translation and interpretation 158 3.10.6. From generative diagram to program 168 3.10.7. Dynamic generative diagrams 171 3.11. The question of selection 175 3.12. Summary and conclusion of part 3 178 4. WAYS OF WORKING: FROM DESIGN PRACTICE TOWARDS THEORY AND DIGITAL DESIGN METHODS 179 4.1. Introduction 179 4.1.1. Practice-based research 180 4.1.2. Visual material is central. 180 4.1.3. Two investigation paths 180 4.1.4. Achievements 180 4.2. Methods 181 4.2.1. Explorative and generative research 182 4.2.2. A first-person approach 183 4.2.3. Analysis 184 4.2.4. The Material 185 4.3. Systematising creative computer use. Ways of working; techniques in creative computer use. 186 4.3.1. Categorization 186 4.3.2. Mapping the field of design computing. 187 4.3.3. Generic techniques 190 4.3.4. Specific techniques 192 4.3.5. Table of techniques 193 4.3.6. Examples of techniques 200 4.3.7. Traces of technology. 213 4.4. The further use of the generated material 219 4.4.1. Realisation strategies 221 4.4.2. Templates and scaffolds 223 4.5. Summary of Part 4 240 PART 5. WAYS OF THINKING: INTENTIONS IN CREATIVE COMPUTER USE. 241 5.1. Intentions 241 5.1.1. Categorising intentions 242 5.2. Intention themes 243 5.2.1. Cases and samples from Group one: Formal, phenomenal, spatial and geometrical themes 244 5.2.2. Intentions of response to the complexity of urban systems 297 5.3. The Hybrid Process 317 5.3.1. Hybridization strategies 319 5.3.2. The hybrid process and its elements. 328 6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 344 6.1. Principles, concepts and methods for creative design computing 344 6.2. A new type of creativity? 348 6.3. A practice as the field for an investigation 349 6.4. Suggestions for further studies 349
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
last changed 2007/04/08 14:11

_id 2005_221
id 2005_221
authors Sousa, José Pedro and Duarte, José Pinto
year 2005
title Digital Desires, Material Realities
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 221-228
summary Digital design and manufacturing technologies are progressively employed in building construction and architects interest in this field has grown widely, as many recent works, publications and scientific meetings demonstrate. By identifying some of the main reasons and expectations that were at the basis of the integration of CAD/CAM processes in the discipline, this paper examines the real success of these technological developments in contemporary architecture. By analyzing current work and literature the authors argue that there is often a discrepancy between the discourse on emerging new conditions for the practice, and the practical reality itself. To investigate this technological gap, the paper discusses in depth one of the most advocated promises of these new technologies: the feasible mass production of differentiation. Considering design intent, available CNC fabrication processes and material properties, it describes and critically analyses different strategies for building architectural surfaces, presenting specific examples from contemporary architecture. Realizing that there are technological limitations in the fulfillment of conceptual aspirations, this paper identifies possible innovative directions in building construction, based on the idea of structural performative surfaces. Finally, the authors reflect on the specific nature of architecture, distinguishing it from other areas that also employ digital technologies, to frame, from within the discipline, the technological expectations and its potential further developments.
keywords CAD/CAM, Digital Fabrication, CNC Technologies, Rationalization, Mass-Customization
series eCAADe
email jps-x@mail.telepac.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_679
id 2005_679
authors Steinø, Nicolai and Veirum, Niels Einar
year 2005
title A Parametric Approach to Urban Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 679-686
summary It is the thesis of this paper, that the application of a parametric design approach to urban design has great potentials for improving the systematic testing and subsequent argumentation for urban design proposals. Parametric design has so far mainly been applied to engineering. However, the ‘components’ constituting an urban design also share similarities that may be defined parametrically. Aspects such as density, use, mix, form, space, and typology may all be defined parametrically. By doing so, it is possible to not only perform a systematic de-sign process, but also to evaluate the pros and cons of scenarios with different parametric settings. On the basis of a theoretical discussion, followed by a case study in the form of a student workshop, the paper will discuss the nature and scope of parametric urban design, draw some preliminary conclusions, and outline some possible perspectives for the development of parametric urban design.
keywords Parametric, Parameters, Urban Design, Methodology, Workshop, CAD
series eCAADe
email steino@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_427
id sigradi2005_427
authors Tannuré, Abel E.
year 2005
title Shadow and digital system: digital techniques and architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 427-432
summary The system proposes to apply the results of the investigation in the task of architecture de-structurizing the idea in order to free the capacity of thought. One works in a three-dimensional way with models built, using discarded material. It is processed by means of digital media, giving a series of images which have been selected. One uses on them different systems of lighting changing the number of lights, the position in space and the distances. Like that one obtains different shadows on a surface; those shadows work in similar form with “eyes” of possible architectural forms. They are digitally processed according to the desired objectives. Several of them are combined adding and removing elements, which makes them dynamic in time. This technique tries to develop a new tool for students who may find the idea spontaneously, with the freedom of thought in three-dimensions like a new form of looking at architecture. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email pipo@tifo.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 2005_341
id 2005_341
authors Uddin, M. Saleh
year 2005
title Animation Techniques to Represent Graphic Analysis of Architecture: A Case Study of Richard Meier’s Atheneum
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 341-348
summary It is debatable whether design can be taught. Frank Lloyd Wright himself mentioned that architecture should be taught by its principles, discerning the principles underlying in works by various architects. In the absence of thoroughly satisfactory methods of combining various means of digital representation for analysis, this paper investigates the features of 3D computer models; in particular, its animation environment to aid graphic analysis of built forms. Computer 3D animations, which are generated from 3D models, have an unparalleled capability to demonstrate spatial experience. Animations can also manipulate the constitute components of the spatial structure, thus illustrating analytically the composition of a building or object. The most significant aspect of 3D animation is in its flexibility of manipulation of various physical and rendering attributes of a 3D model. For the purpose of case study analysis, Richard Meier’s Atheneum in New Harmony, Indiana is chosen for its clarity in design elements and demonstration of applicable principles. Through various animation clips, the basic techniques are illustrated as an effective method of communicating concepts of graphic analysis.
keywords 3D Animation, Analytic Diagram, Form Analysis, Design Principles, 3D Model
series eCAADe
email UddinSaleh@aol.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_2_13_167
id cf2005_2_13_167
authors VANDE MOERE Andrew
year 2005
title Form Follows Data
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 31-40
summary This paper analyzes the relationships between creative design and the field of information visualization, with a focus on historical connotations and newest developments that show great potential. Empirical evidence shows how designers often employ information visualization as a creative concept capable of significantly determining the design outcome, and vice versa, how information visualization can be enhanced by exploring interdisciplinary concepts, such as design cognition, user engagement, aesthetics and art. Several symbiotic dependencies are explained and demonstrated, including the first conceptual cyberspace and information architecture definitions. This paper will argue that information visualization should be enriched with the principles of creative design and art, to develop valuable data representations that address the emotional experience and engagement of users, instead of solely focusing on task effectiveness metrics. Finally, several interdisciplinary movements are described that show great symbiotic potential in the near future, especially in the fields of ambient information displays, informative art and location-based information awareness.
keywords information visualization, aesthetics, design, information architecture
series CAAD Futures
email andrew@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id 2005_787
id 2005_787
authors Veikos, Cathrine
year 2005
title The Post-Medium Condition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 787-794
summary Theorists in art, architecture and visual media have described the digital world as a world of mediumlessness and proclaimed that the medium of a work, once the ontological determinant for the classification of the arts, is rendered meaningless by recent technological and cultural developments (Krauss, 2000; Negroponte, 1995; Manovich, 2001). Although indebted to specific media-based techniques and their attendant ideologies, software removes the material reality of techniques to an immaterial condition where the effects of material operations are reproduced abstractly. This paper asserts that a productive approach for digital design can be found in the acknowledgement that the importance of the digital format is not that it de-materializes media, but that it allows for the maximum intermingling of media. A re-conceptualization of media follows from this, defined now as, a set of conventions derived from the material conditions of a given technical support, conventions out of which to develop a form of expressiveness that can be both projective and mnemonic (Krauss, 2000). The paper will focus on the identification of these conventions towards the development of new forms of expressiveness in architecture. Further demonstration of the intermingling of materially-based conventions is carried out in the paper through a comparative analysis of contemporary works of art and architecture, taking installation art as a particular example. A new design approach based on the maximum intermingling of media takes account of integrative strategies towards the digital and the material and sees them as inextricably linked. In the digital “medium” different sets of conventions derived from different material conditions transfer their informational assets producing fully formed, material-digital ingenuity.
keywords Expanded Architecture, Art Practice, Material, Information, ParametricTechniques, Evolutionary Logics
series eCAADe
email veikos@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_279
id 2005_279
authors Walz, Steffen P., Schoch, Odilo, Ochsendorf, Mathias and Spindler, Torsten
year 2005
title Serious Fun: Pervasive game design as a CAAD teaching and research method
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 279-286
summary Today and in the future, architectural students must be prepared for designing both physical and adaptive, computer-integrated spaces. The question is: How do we easily and effectively convey architecturally relevant theories and practices of pervasive computing in teaching? In this paper, we present a didactic model that has proved to be a possible answer. During a semester long design class, we supervised an interdisciplinary group of architecture and computer science students who teamworked on an early so called serious pervasive game prototype, entitled “ETHGame”. The class culminated in a two week compact phase and a presentation before ETH representatives involved in e-learning projects. The resulting interactive prototype takes advantage of our campus’s extensive wireless local area network infrastructure, allowing for user positioning and location based learning, servicing, and peer-to-peer communication. The game mutates the whole of the ETH Zurich campus into a knowledge space, issuing position dependent and position relevant questions to players. The ETHGame forces participants to engage with a given space in the form of a quiz and rewards them for collaborating both face-to-face and facelessly. The game helps them build a collective academic and space aware identity whilst being immersed in a sentient environment. Thus, in this paper we are introducing serious pervasive game design as a novel design research and teaching paradigm for CAAD, as well as a e-learning design strategy.
keywords Pervasive Computing; Pervasive Game Design; Serious Games; LocationBased Learning; Knowledge Space
series eCAADe
email spindler@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_246
id acadia05_246
authors Wierzbicki-Neagu, Madalina
year 2005
title Unfolding Architecture – Study, Development and Application of New Kinetic Structure Topologies
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 246-253
summary Advances in design tools and material engineering open new possibilities for architectural structures that may respond better to the demands of the increasing density of development, better space management and lesser environmental impact. Folding structures that provide adjustable on demand configurations can be effectively conceptualized if appropriate interdisciplinary expertise is brought together. Kinematic chain geometries borrowed from traditional mechanics can be developed into a variety of topologies suitable for architectural structures. Rectilinear deformable grids can provide the functionality of expanding and collapsing as well as the ability to be infinitely arrayed. Converging grids allow for circular arrays and fan like folding. The challenge is to translate a two-dimensional chain concept into a three-dimensional array of interleaved frames that form a stable structure and can bear the necessary loads. In order to complement the folding structure with the corresponding foldable shell, the algebra of rigid folds can be adapted to develop viable geometrical concepts. The demands of the design process needed to develop kinetic structures will expand the traditional architectural workflow to include parametric modeling tools that are common in mechanical engineering. Folding architectural structures require, besides traditional architectural layout development, parametric assembly capabilities and motion analysis typical for mechanical design. Potential application development, marketing, building code changes and effective multidisciplinary collaboration must take place for kinetic structures to enter the architectural mainstream.
series ACADIA
email madalina@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ijac20053102
id ijac20053102
authors Burry, Jane; Felicetti, Peter; Tang, Jiwu; Burry, Mark; Xie, Mike
year 2005
title Dynamical structural modeling A collaborative design exploration
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 1, 27-42
summary This study is based on a generative performative modeling approach that engages architects and structural engineers in close dialogue. We focus on knowledge shared between engineers and architects to apply the Finite Element Analysis based structural design technique Evolutionary Structural Optimization [ESO] as a way to understand or corroborate the performance factors that are significant in determining architectural form. ESO is very close conceptually to the dynamical system of matter and forces of growth itself. It has parallels both mathematical and metaphorical with natural evolution and morphogenesis so it has been poignant to apply the approach to a formal architectural case study in which the generative influence of these processes is inherent.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2005_a_7b_a
id caadria2005_a_7b_a
authors Abdullah, A.Q.M. ; Md. Emran Hossain, Md. Shabab Habib Khan
year 2005
title Digital Perception, Development and Presentation in Architecture: a study of Bangladesh with global context
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 255-267
summary In the recent past the computer has become an important tool in both the design and presentation media/method in architecture. In this paper digitalization in architectural practice and architectural education in both the global and Bangladesh contexts have been studied. A survey questionnaire was carried out to find how and to what extent available software are being used in Bangladesh for this purpose. Opinion, views, expectations of architects from leading architectural firms of Bangladesh were studied to understand the future prospect of this field in Bangladesh.
series CAADRIA
email abdullah@bracuniversity.ac.bd, emran@bracuniversity.ac.bd, jitul@vfemail.net
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id 2005_287
id 2005_287
authors Achten, Henri and Reymen, Isabelle
year 2005
title Structured Reflection as a Means to Deepen Understanding of CAAD
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 287-294
summary In this paper we outline a strategy of structured reflection to improve reflection by students in a course on the implication of CAAD, design theory, and design methodology. Earlier editions of the course showed that students often did not evolve their learning beyond a checklist level. Reflection is an important mechanism to improve learning from design situations. After a consideration of the main approaches to design reflection, we take up Schön’s notion of reflection and provide support for structured reflection in CAAD education, based on earlier experiences with structured question lists in a civil engineering course. Findings after the first year’s run show a deeper level of reflection on a more elaborate level.
keywords Structured Reflection, CAAD, Education
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2005_a_2b_a
id caadria2005_a_2b_a
authors Affleck, Janice; Kvan Thomas
year 2005
title REINTERPRETING VIRTUAL HERITAGE
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 169-178
summary This paper describes the context and proposal for an alternative approach to the common pattern of application of digital tools in the area of cultural heritage, also know as Virtual Heritage (VH). It investigates and addresses arising issues in a digital case study developed to implement a theoretical framework and investigate how and if existing technology can support it.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email janiceaffleck@hkusua.hku.hk, tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id 2005_083
id 2005_083
authors Agostinho, Francisco Santos
year 2005
title Architecture as Drawing, Perception and Cognition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 83-90
summary This work is about realizing that human perception is inherent to architecture. It is an asset and a trait subject to training and development in an empirical way, involving physical and manual action. It cannot be taught literally through convention and logic reasoning. It is a human achievement of great significance built on intellectual and scientific knowledge. It is something, being physical and empirical, that is supported on instrumental procedure. The computer, as a machine and an instrument, does not shorten the empirical experience of manipulation; on the contrary, it enhances J.J. Gibson’s findings about the perception of space in relation to eye and body movement. Being a cybernetic machine the computer may, and shall, evolve, and become perceptive. In order for that to happen, it is important to keep in mind the mechanism of human perception. Through producing a computerized model of a major architectural work, we develop natural knowledge about its physical features and the thought that lies underneath. To be able to use the computer as an instrument provides a user with explicit knowledge about its ways and mechanism that has to be made available. It involves training, which is to a great extent self-explanatory, and also explicit knowledge about the conventions that are being used, such as programming, reasoning and trigonometry.
keywords Visualization; Environmental Simulation; Knowledge Modelling (KM); 3D Modeling
series eCAADe
email franc@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_010
id 2005_010
authors Aish, Robert
year 2005
title From Intuition to Precision
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 10-14
summary Design has been described as making inspire decisions with incomplete information. True, we may use prior knowledge, we may even think we understand the causalites involved, but what really matters is exploration: of new forms, of new materials, and speculation about the response to the resulting effects. Essentially, this exploration has its own dynamics, involving intuition and spontaneity, and without which there is no design. But of course we all know that this is not the whole story. Design is different to 'craft'; to directly 'making' or 'doing'. It necessarily has to be predictive in order to anticipate what the consequence of the 'making' or 'doing' will be. Therefore we inevitably have to counter balance our intuition with a well developed sense of premeditation. We have to be able to reason about future events, about the consequence of something that has not yet being made. There is always going to be an advantage if this reasoning can be achieved with a degree of precision. So how can we progress from intuition to precision? What abstractions can we use to represent, externalize and test the concepts involved? How can we augment the cognitive processes? How can we record the progression of ideas? And, how do we know when we have arrived? Design has a symbiotic relationship with geometry. There are many design issues that are independent of any specific configurations. We might call these “pre-geometric” issues. And having arrived at a particular configuration, there may be many material interpretations of the same geometry. We might call these “post-geometric” issues. But geometry is central to design, and without appropriate geometric understanding, the resulting design will be limited. Geometry has two distinct components, one is a formal descriptive system and the other is a process of subjective evaluation.
series eCAADe
email Robert.Aish@bentley.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ijac20053201
id ijac20053201
authors Aitcheson, Robert; Friedman, Jonathan; Seebohm, Thomas
year 2005
title 3-Axis CNC Milling in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 161-180
summary Physical scale models still have a role in architectural design. 3-axis CNC milling provides one way of making scale models both for study purposes and for presentation in durable materials such as wood. We present some types of scale models, the methods for creating them and the place in the design process that scale models occupy. We provide an overview of CNC milling procedures and issues and we describe the process of how one can creatively develop appropriate methods for milling different types of scale models and materials. Two case studies are presented with which we hope to convey not only the range of possible models that can be machined but also the way one creatively explores to arrive at appropriate milling strategies. Where apposite, we compare 3-axis CNC milling to newer technologies used for rapid prototyping but rapid prototyping is not a primary focus.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

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