CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 641 to 660 of 730

_id ga0001
id ga0001
authors Soddu, Celestino
year 2000
title From Forming to Transforming
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The ancient codes of harmony stem from the human vision of the complexity of nature. They allow us to think the possible, to design it and to perform its realization. The first gesture of every designer is to take, in a new application that is born from a need the opportunity to experiment with a possible harmonic code. And to operate in the evolution of the project so that this code buds and breeds beauty as a mirror of the complexity and wonder of nature. In this design activity, project after project, every architect builds his own code. This is strongly present in diverse ways in every architect. The code of harmony born from the attention of every man to the complexity of nature, manifests itself in interpretation, which is logical and therefore feasible, of the laws of formalization of relationships. Every interpretation is different and belongs to the oneness of every architect. Every interpretative code stems from, and reveals, our approach to the world, our cultural references, our history, our present and the memory of our past. Each idea is born as a representation of the interpretative code that is a cryptic and subjective code, even if it refers as constant to history of man. Generative art is the maximum expression of this human challenge: it traces a code as a reference to the complexity of nature, and it makes it feasible. So man is the craftsman of the possible, according to the laws of the natural harmony. What does a code of the harmony contain? As for all codes it contains some rules that trace certain behaviors. It is not therefore a sequence, a database of events, of forms, but it defines behaviors: the transformations. To choose forms and to put them together is an activity that can also resemble that of a designer, but essentially it is the activity of the client. The designer does not choose forms but operates transformations, because only by doing so can he put a code of harmony into effect. Between transforming and choosing forms one can trace the borderline between architects and clients, between who designs and who chooses the projected objects. This difference must be reconsidered especially today because we are going toward a hybridization in which the client wants to feel himself a designer, even if he only chooses. And the designer, using sophisticated tools, works as chooser between different solutions, in practice as a client. To design, to create through transformations is, however, an activity that takes time. The generative design, building a usable and upgradable code, makes time virtual and therefore allows the architect, even in a speeded-up world as today is, to design and reach levels of complexity that mirror the complexity of nature and its beauty.
series other
email celestino.soddu@polimi.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id diss_sola
id diss_sola
authors Sola-Morales, Pau
year 2000
title Representation in Architecture: A Data Model for Computer-Aided Architectural Design
source DDes Thesis, Harvard Design School, Cambridge, MA
summary Traditional representation systems – including technical drawings, perspectives, models and photography – have historically been used by architects to communicate projectual ideas to other agents in the process, as well to communicate ideas to themselves and recording them for future reference. The increasing complexity of the projects, involving more agents in ever more distant locations; the need for a greater semantic richness to express all the subtleties of the technical, cost and styling details; and -- most importantly – the introduction of computers in every day practice, which enable powerful data generation and manipulation; all these factors together demand for a new representation system adapted to the new digital medium. Yet, traditional CAAD software packages do not offer a solution to any of these problems, for their data model is too simplified to model complex projects and ideas, and are based on geometrical representations of the built environment. This dissertation addresses the issue of computer representation of architecture, and tries to refocus the discussion from a “geometric representation of objects” to a “representation of relationships among objects.” After studying the nature of design, it is observed that objects in the built environment can be represented as patterns of relationships. Based on the object-oriented data model (OODM), which can capture such relationships, the research proposes a new data model and a new set of abstractions of architectural elements that represent the patterns of relationships among them. The resulting representations are networks of design concepts and intentions, hypertext-like structures conveying all the semantic richness of the architectural project, containing qualitative as well as quantitative information. It is analogous to a “digital writing” or “encoding” of architecture. Being stored in an OO, centralized, concurrent database, these object models can be shared and exchanged among design professionals, adding up to a universal computer-readable design representation system.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id e7a4
authors Spitz, Rejane and Del Pup, Claudio
year 2000
title Auto retratos com interferências: uma experiência de intercâmbio artístico e enriquecimento acadêmico (Self-portraits with Interferance: An Experience of Artistic Exchange and Academic Enrichment)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 20-23
summary During the SIGRADI ‘99 conference, different “groups of interest” were formed, in specific areas, including “Group of Arts”, formed by professionals interested in exchanging experiences and developing academic research in areas of Art & Design. As a result of that interaction, the PUC-Rio (Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro) and the IENBA (Instituto Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, Montevideo, Uruguay), supported by the SECIU (Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay), took the challenge of developing a first pilot experience, involving teachers and pupils from the Computación Gráfica (Graphic computing) area, of those institutions. By means of the Internet, a collaborative, artistic project was developed, leading to the creation of poetic, metaphoric, and in some cases, playful pieces of work. In terms of its educational goals - as well as in terms of its social achievements - this experience was considered very effective, which led to its expansion and deepening, during the current year: more educators and students in Brazil, Uruguay and United States have joined the group, for the development of the collaborative work “Exquisite Corpse”.
series SIGRADI
email rejane@rdc.puc-rio.br, claudio.delpup@quanam.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id a3b8
authors Spodek, Jonathan
year 2000
title Integrating Basic Technology: 3-D Modeling and the Internet in the Studio
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 3-6
summary One of the great challenges of architectural education is to teach students how to communicate with other project participants. Communication is critical not only within the design team, but also with outside participants. This year, 4th year architectural students at Ball State University engaged in a unique 12-week design problem on the remote island of Utila, Honduras.1 This project used basic computer technology to create a dynamic communication forum between the U.S. and Honduras. It also afforded an opportunity for students to use both computer generated and traditional architectural models to gain a deeper level of understanding of the relationship between design and construction.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 887b
authors SQin, S.F., Wright, D.K. and Jordanov, I.N.
year 2000
title From on-line sketching to 2D and 3D geometry: a system based on fuzzy knowledge
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 32 (14) (2000) pp. 851-866
summary The paper describes the development of a fuzzy knowledge-based prototype system for conceptual design. This real time system is designed to infer user's sketchingintentions, to segment sketched input and generate corresponding geometric primitives: straight lines, circles; arcs, ellipses, elliptical arcs, and B-spline curves. Topologyinformation (connectivity, unitary constraints and pairwise constraints) is received dynamically from 2D sketched input and primitives. From the 2D topology information, amore accurate 2D geometry can be built up by applying a 2D geometric constraint solver. Subsequently, 3D geometry can be received feature by feature incrementally. Eachfeature can be recognised by inference knowledge in terms of matching its 2D primitive configurations and connection relationships. The system accepts not only sketchedinput, working as an automatic design tool, but also accepts user interactive input of both 2D primitives and special positional 3D primitives. This makes it easy and friendlyto use. The system has been tested with a number of sketched inputs of 2D and 3D geometry.
keywords Conceptual Design, Geometric Modelling, Fuzzy Knowledge
series journal paper
email sqin@lboro.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id 0e2f
authors Stach, Edgar
year 2000
title EXPO 2000 Pavilion and Exposition: Precedent Studies
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 18-20
summary Included in this article are two second year architecture graduate student precedent studies to understand the complexity of a built project and its functional, structural and spatial design concept. Students were instructed to ‘disassemble’ the building according to Form & Function, Structure & Construction, Materials, and Display Methods. Through the use of computer-generated models the students were able to understand the relationship between space and structure without having to physically travel to the pavilion sites. The computer offered the unique ability to explore a spatial study of buildings and places that no longer exist (such as the IBM Pavilion by Renzo Piano), as well as to anticipate the spatial qualities of spaces that are not yet built (similar to the Swiss Pavilion by Peter Zumthor). Final analysis drawings were created through manipulating the computer models to explain the Space & Form (spatial hierarchies), Spatial Sequence (circulation, path & place, and exhibition sequencing), and Space & Order (structure, proportion, and systems).
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id ddssar0026
id ddssar0026
authors Steadman, Philip and Waddoups, Linda
year 2000
title A catalogue of built forms, using a binary representation
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary A technique is described for the representation of a class of rectangular built forms. Each individual form is produced by applying a series of transformations to a single generic or ‘archetypal’ form, which is designed to take care of the broad constraints, on built space, of close-packing and the requirements for natural light and views. Parts of the archetype which are selected for inclusion in any particular built form are then designated by 1s, and parts which are suppressed by 0s. This makes it possible to assign a unique binary code to each different (undimensioned) built form produced from the archetype. Binary codes corresponding to all legitimate forms may then be arranged in ascending order, to create a comprehensive catalogue. The paper describes such a catalogue comprising forms with up to four courtyards, described by 22-digit binary strings. Metric values may be assigned to the various dimensions of each form, making it a matter of simple arithmetic to compute such attributes as volume, surface area, minimum site area or floor space index. From logical operations on the binary strings it is possible to identify a series of configurational characteristics of the corresponding forms, such as their overall plan shapes, the number of courtyards or the potential for symmetry. The catalogue may thus be searched for built forms fulfilling some set of specifications, for example total floor area, site size and certain desired shape attributes. Worked examples are illustrated from the design of multi-storey office buildings. Possible applications are suggested for this approach, in architectural science and the early strategic stages of architectural design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c34a
authors Stipech, Alfredo
year 2000
title Carrera de Posgrado en Proyectación Análogo-Digital (Graduate Studies in Analogue-Digital Design)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 339-343
summary The paper contains the description of the Graduate Studies in Analog-Digital Project, which we consider the first one in this matter, and also a synthesis of the conclusions arrived at in the pedagogic aspects and in the professional praxis. The integration of the Analog and Digital Means originates in the evaluation of the changes underwent both by the University and the Architect’s offices in the last ten years in Argentina. It is a faithful reflection of the deep cultural and social transformations that modified the way of Perceiving, Designing and Thinking both Architecture and traditional urban space. Furthermore, the projectual incumbency is enlarged with the appearance of the Digital Space as a topic. The proposal is to theoretically experience and analyze of the project, integrating the Digital Means (virtual-immaterial) with the Analog Means (manual-materials) in the process of ideation and formalization, as a reality of daily use in the production of Architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arqasoc@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id f727
authors Stouffs, Rudi and Krishnamur, Ramesh
year 2000
title Alternative Computational Design Representations
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 200-202
summary Supporting data sharing among different disciplines, applications, and users in the building industry is a complex and difficult task. Standardization efforts and research into product models have since long attempted to facilitate data exchange among building partners, with little result so far. Different technologies have resulted in different approaches, in particular, an object-oriented approach has led to the specification of IFCs as a basis for information sharing, while other initiatives adopt XML as a flexible language for marking up and describing project information. We propose a concept for representational flexibility, named sorts, that combines many of the advantages of both approaches. Based on an extensible vocabulary of representational classes and compositional relationships and grounded in an object-oriented framework that has each of the representational classes specify its own operational behavior, it will enable a designer to define, develop, and adopt alternative design representations that can suit a specific purpose or task at hand.
series SIGRADI
email r.stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl, ramesh+@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id c8a7
authors Svetel, Igor
year 2000
title Using Machine Learning Techniques to Enhance Expressiveness of Computer-based Design Systems
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 321-325
summary More and more designers use computers and netAbstract In face of the huge expansion of computer-mediated interaction among people, current representation-centered CAAD systems do not offer full information spectrum necessary to express all design intentions. Representational structures that those systems use suppress expression of affective information that plays a major role in design process. The paper describes few experiments conducted at the IMS Institute to enhance expressiveness of the CAAD systems.
keywords Expression, Emotion, Machine Learning
series eCAADe
email isvetel@infosky.net
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 1e1b
authors Svilanovich Zaldumbide, Paulina A.
year 2000
title Arquitectura Mediatica: De lo temporal a lo espacial de lo colectivo a lo virtual (Architecture of Media: From the Time-Base to the Space-Base, From the Colective to the Virtual)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 84-89
summary The objective of this investigation is to explore in the digital configuration and to discuss its implications, inspirations and applications. This investigation intends a design method to be applied spacely in what we have called the re-interpretation of the space experienciable, to drive the project but well toward the production of “scenarios” able to harbor the unpredictability of the civic eventses, fomenting a such organization that articulates the one among of non physical spaces. As final product five “scenarios“ were created (new experiencial virtual experenciable), using technical film in their methodological development where is recognized in the process their qualities and possible bonds, then in a final stage the inter-relationship among the methodological constants generates and feedback the general proposal: The inductive sequence of the ASSEMBLY (expressed through animations), understanding this last concept like the paradigm of the film development applied in this occasion to the architectural proposal.
series SIGRADI
email psvilanov@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 463e
authors Szewczyk, Jaroslaw
year 2000
title Intelligent User Interface for Computer Aided Architectural Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 251-254
summary The first versions of AutoCAD enabled an architect to operate all of the most frequently used commands through the use of mouse and side menu. The AutoCAD 2.6 side menu offered 16 main items and 157 commands of the submenu. Total mastery of approx. 200 commands (including a dozen or so of instructions excluded from the menu and some of system variables) was equal to a very good proficiency in the program.
keywords User interface, Design Environment
series eCAADe
email jarsz@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id sigradi2009_806
id sigradi2009_806
authors Sánchez Cavazos, Maria Estela
year 2009
title Modernismo, fundamento del Diseño Digital [Modernism, fundament of the Digital Design]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary In this paper, the results of various investigations realized in the UAA and UANL have been gathered, since the year 2000, where the practice of architectonic design has been studied with and without computer, with the purpose of preparing students and teachers about the way of learning to do architectonic design with the new digital technologies. To explain the transformations that the architectonic Design has suffered with the use of the computer, a summarized table has been realized to show the roll that Modernism plays in the transition period between traditional and digital design.
keywords Modernism; Digital Design; Architectonic design; Computer Assisted Design; International Style
series SIGRADI
email mesanche@correo.uaa.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id sigradi2006_c093b
id sigradi2006_c093b
authors Sánchez Cavazos, María Estela
year 2006
title El Aprendizaje del Diseño Arquitectónico en el mundo digital [Architectural design learning in a digital world]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 210-214
summary The background of this paper goes back to the yer 2000 when its autor realizad an investigation in the architecture workshops. In that same year she finished her master's thesis about the design process and continued with investigations observing the influence of the computer use in the process. The main goal of the paper is to determine if the digital mediums take an important role between the connection of knowledges, actitudes and habilites for the architectonic design. The methodology used for the data collection was trough participant observations, interviews and cuasiexperiments. The paper shows how the student takes elements from the knowledges, actitudes and habilities, and connects them to realize constructions of new schemes of knowledge in the architectonic design process; the use of old and new tools to design and how it influences the outcome is observed.
series SIGRADI
email mesanche@correo.uaa.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id 5ba3
authors Tan, M., Tan, B.K. and Ngahtemin, J.
year 2000
title By Rhyme or Reason. Rapid Design Thinking by Digital Cross Referencing
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 399-410
summary A prime objective of a visual database for design thinking is to support trains of thought. The game of "Rhyme or Reason" provides a clue for the cognitive basis for mind racing. In particular, it shows why in creative design speed matters, why we need memory cues, why reasoning by lateral association and conceptual positioning are as important as logical pattern matching. Unlike a conventional database, such as a banking system, which is concerned with the correct convergence on specific records, visual databases for design thinking need to support divergent exploration. The paper presents a method of "multivalent" tagging of discrete items in the database. It provides for knowledge of relations. This achieves two things. Firstly, it enables the search engine to return a specific database item in different exploratory contexts because of the multiple ways it can meet the search criteria. Secondly, the different tagged aspects of the item can be used to trigger new exploratory routes. The user can explore other tagged aspects whose relationship to the original search criteria need not exist in the indexing system. Short of this, a search is dependent on direct literal or other variants of pattern matching to retrieve only parts of a database. The strategies for sustainable input-output, and for search-storage of a visual database demand high modularity and generic structures which are not dependent on specific software or computer system. The paper specifies its open structure and its transparent and re-configurable methods. These are non-trivial design issues.
series CAADRIA
email akitanbk@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2002/11/29 16:54

_id 44cd
authors Tang, Hsien-Hui and Gero, John S.
year 2000
title A Content-Oriented Coding Scheme for Protocol Analysis and Computer-Aided Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 265-275
summary In this paper we introduce a content-oriented scheme for protocol studies of designers and demonstrate its benefit for CAAD research. The structure of the coding scheme is described. We discuss how this method can benefit CAAD research and its differences from the process-oriented method used previously. With this method we analyze data to describe the design process as the combination of sensor-driven and process-driven processes. The results emphasize the importance of the sensor-driven processes in the design process. As a consequence we are able to propose some areas for CAAD tools that are based on the cognitive behaviours of designers.
series CAADRIA
email hhtang@arch.usyd.edu.au, john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id ee52
authors Tang, M.-X., Frazer, J.H. and Liu, H.
year 2000
title Design Concept Learning Using Inductive Learning Techniques in an Integrated Design Support System
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 201-213
summary Design and learning are closely related activities. Conceptual design is characterized by the uncertainties of the issues related to the design problem, design requirements, design constraints, and design solutions. Organizing design information to define an area of design problem within which these issues are gradually structured involves an inductive learning process. This paper tackles this learning process during conceptual design by utilizing inductive learning and concept formation techniques. The paper presents the architecture and the implementation of a Design Concept Learning System (DCLS) within a multi-agent architecture. It then reports on how the DCLS can be applied to conceptual design tasks in different domains.
series CAADRIA
email sdfrazer@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id ga0101
id ga0101
authors Tanzini, Luca
year 2000
title Universal City
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary "Universal City" is a multimedia performance that documents the evolution of the city in history. Whereas in the past the city was symbolically the world, today the world has become a city. The city rose up in an area once scattered and disorganized for so long that most of its ancient elements of culture were destroyed. It absorbed and re synthesized the remnants of this culture, cultivating power and efficiency. By means of this concentration of physical and cultural power, the city accelerated the rhythm of human relationships and converted their products into forms that are easily stockpiled and reproduced. Along with monuments, written documents and ordered associative organizations amplified the impact of all human activities, extending backwards and forwards over time. Since the beginning however, law and order stood alongside brute force, and power was always determined by these new institutions. Written law served to produce a canon of justice and equality that claimed a higher principle: the king's will, synonymous with divine command. The Urban Neolithic Revolution is comparable only to the Industrial Revolution, and the Media Technology in our own era. There is of course a substantial difference: ours is an era of immeasurable technological progress as an end in itself, which leads to the explosion of the city, and the consequent dissemination of its structure across the countryside. The old walled city has not only fallen, it's buried its foundations. Our civilization flees from every possibility of control, by means of its own extra resources not controllable by the egregious ambitions of man. The image of modern industrialization that Charlie Chaplin resurrected from the past in "Modern Times" is the exact opposite of contemporary metropolitan reality. He figured the worker as a slave chained to his machine and fed by machinery as he continued to work at maintaining the machine itself. Today the workplace is not so brutal, but automation has made it much more oppressive. Energy and dedication once directed towards the production process are today shifted towards consumption. The metropolis in the final phase of its evolution, is becoming a collective mechanism for maintaining the function of this system, and for giving the illusion of power, wealth, happiness, and total success, to those who are, in actuality, its victims. It is a concept foreign to the modern metropolitan mentality that life should be an occasion to Live, and not an excuse for generating newspaper articles, television interviews, or mass spectacles for those who know nothing better. Instead the process continues, until people prefer the simulacrum to the real, where image dominates over object, the copy over the original, representation over reality, appearance over Being. The first phase of the Economy's domination over social life brought about the visible degradation of every human accomplishment from "Being" into "Having". The present phase of social life's total occupation by the accumulated effects of the Economy is leading to a general downslide from "Having" into "Seeming". The performance is based on the instantaneous interaction between video and music: the video component is assembled in real time with RandomCinema a software that I developed and projected on a screen. The music-noise is the product of human radical improvisation togheter automatic-computer process. Everything is based on the consideration of the element of chance as a stimulus for the construction of the most options. The unpredictable helps to reveal things as they happen. The montage, the music, and their interaction, are born and die and the same moment: there are no stage directions or scripts.
series other
email tanzini@media.unisi.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id a832
authors Terzidis, Kostas
year 1999
title Computers and the Creative Process
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 43-50
summary In this paper the role of the computer in the creative process is discussed. The main focus is the investigation of whether computers can be regarded as candidates for sharing or participating in a task that has been attached almost exclusively to humans: that of creativity.
series eCAADe
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ga0016
id ga0016
authors Thum, Robert and Derix, Christian
year 2000
title Artificial Neural Network Spaces
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary In the processes of continues functional differentiation the contemporary society increasingly displays the characteristics of complex, distributed systems. In this condition architecture can no longer rely on top-down reductionist methodologies in ignoring the constituting importance of contextual parameters. The present paper describes how Artificial Neural Networks can be employed to design with-in the underlying logic of our society -the logic of distributed systems. In computer simulations the paper explores the capability of ANN to Self-organization: Neural Networks Architectures absorb and adapt vast amount of urban data in order to adjust their organization to exterior changes through interior structural reconfiguration, thus producing adaptive spatial formations.    
series other
type normal paper
email Christian.Derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/25 05:42

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